Why Do Babies Hate the Sun?

  • By: Sandra
  • Date: March 18, 2022
  • Time to read: 6 min.

The sun is a powerful thing. It can give us life-sustaining warmth and vitamin D.

It can cause skin cancer and wrinkles and sun burn.

Unfortunately, our newborns can only absorb a certain quantity of sunshine each day, and too much can be very dangerous. Babies have thinner skin than adults and they don’t produce as much melanin, so they are more susceptible to sunburns. Newborns should always be kept in the shade when outside and sunscreen should be liberally applied.

Why does my baby hate the sun?

There are a few theories. One is that babies have an innate sense that too much sun can be harmful. Another is that they’re uncomfortable in the heat and bright light. And finally, it could simply be because they haven’t yet learned to enjoy the outdoors like we do. Whilst we might love the sun blasting at us, babies might just get too hot and uncomfortable in the prickly heat!

Babies usually start to tolerate the sun a little better as they get older. But it’s important to still be careful and keep them in the shade when possible. And don’t forget the sunscreen!

Babies’ Eyes and Direct Sunlight

Another reason why babies hate the sun is because of their delicate eyes. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children younger than six months should not be exposed to any direct sunlight.

After six months, babies should only be allowed outside in the early morning or late afternoon when the sun isn’t as strong. And they should always wear sunscreen and a hat.

The AAP also recommends that children have their eyes examined yearly by an ophthalmologist, even if there are no problems detected.

Babies’ eyes are very sensitive to sunlight and can be damaged easily. Prolonged exposure can cause cataracts, macular degeneration, and other vision problems.

Can babies wear sunglasses?

Yes, babies can wear sunglasses, but make sure they have a good UV protection. You can find sunglasses made for infants and toddlers that have 100% UVA and UVB protection.

Sunglasses are not just for summertime! Babies should wear them all year round to protect their eyes from the sun’s harmful rays.

We love the baby sunglasses with a band that goes around this head, this ensures they stay on and don’t get lost.

Baby sun exposure time

The bottom line is that babies should not be exposed to direct sunlight for extended periods of time. The best way to protect them is by following these sun safety tips:

  • Keeping them in the shade
  • Make sure they have no exposed skin
  • Apply sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 50 or higher
  • Wear a wide-brimmed sun hat to protect their face, neck, and ears
  • Baby Sunglasses with 100% UVA and UVB protection
  • Remember that even on cloudy days the sun’s rays can be harmful.
  • Limit time to a few minutes in the morning or evening

The best protection for many parents of young babies is to keep them inside. We know, it’s hard to resist those sweet baby cheeks, but the sun is just too powerful for them.

Stay safe and enjoy the outdoors with your little one when they are a bit older!

Health Benefits of the Sun on Baby’s Skin

Although direct sunlight is a rich source of vitamin D, a baby’s skin is too fragile to be exposed to it. It contains too little melanin. Babies should only be outside for a short amount of time in the morning or evening when the sun isn’t as strong.

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun has many other health benefits, such as preventing and treating some skin diseases in adults. But these should be obtained through controlled exposure, not by direct sunlight exposure.

The sun might boost our serotonin levels but it can be uncomfortable for babies and kids of a young age. The light can just be too much for your toddler to play. Their toys get also get too hot so ensure you are also putting them in the shade this summer.

Why do kids hate wearing sunscreen?

Most likely, it’s because the sunscreen lotion feels thick and greasy on their skin. Sunscreen should be liberally applied, especially if your child will be outside for a long time.

Remember, clothing is not enough to protect your baby from the sun.

What Sun Protection Factor?

Look for sunscreens that are labeled “broad-spectrum” and have an SPF of 50 or higher.

Sunscreens labeled ‘for infants’ or’sensitive’ are less likely to irritate the skin. Always test the sunscreen on a small area of your baby’s skin to see if there are any allergic skin reactions. Speak to your healthcare professional if you do see an allergic reaction.

It is not enough just to keep your baby in the shade. UV radiation from the sun can still cause skin cancer, even on cloudy days.

Also, even if they have sun screen protection on it is better for them to play in a shady place and only be outside for shorter periods of time.

Heatstroke in Babies

Heatstroke is a serious condition that can occur when a baby’s body temperature rises to 107°F (42°C) or higher. Heatstroke can cause brain damage and even death.

Symptoms of heatstroke include:

  • extreme thirst
  • not urinating for more than eight hours
  • dizziness
  • fainting
  • nausea or vomiting
  • rapid heartbeat
  • flushed skin

If you think your baby has heatstroke, call 911 immediately.

Don’t cover your baby’s pram

When it’s hot outside, don’t cover your baby’s pram with a blanket. This will trap the heat and can cause your baby to become overheated. Instead, use a sunshade or parasol to protect your baby from the sun.

Are babies sensitive to sun?

Yes, babies are sensitive to sun and should not be exposed to direct sunlight for extended periods of time. The best way to protect them is by following these sun safety tips:

– Keeping them in the shade

– Making sure they have no exposed skin

– Applying sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 50 or higher

– Wearing a wide-brimmed sun hat to protect their face, neck, and ears

– Putting on sunglasses with 100% UVA and UVB protection

– Limiting time outside to a few minutes in the morning or evening when the sun isn’t as strong.

Stay safe this summer and enjoy the outdoors with your little one!

How do I get my baby used to sunlight?

Sunlight is a rich source of vitamin D, but direct sunlight is too powerful for babies. Babies should only be outside for a short amount of time in the morning or evening when the sun isn’t as strong.

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun has many other health benefits, such as preventing and treating some skin diseases in adults. But these should be obtained through controlled exposure, not by direct sunlight exposure.

What does sunlight do for babies?

Sunlight exposure is important for babies because it helps their body produce vitamin D. Vitamin D is essential for strong bones and teeth. It also plays a role in regulating the immune system.

But direct sunlight is too powerful for babies and should only be outside for a short amount of time in the morning or evening when the sun isn’t as strong. You can still get the benefits of sunlight by spending time outside in the shade.

Clothing is not enough to protect your baby from the sun. Sunscreen should be liberally applied, especially if your child will be outside for a long time.

Take Away On Why Babies Hate Sun

Whilst it might feel that there is nothing lovelier than a walk in the park or playing in the pool on a hot sunny day, for babies this is not so. Remember in pregnancy how you hated the sun? Well, babies feel like that too. Babies tend to hate planes as well, so if you are planning on flying to the sun… perhaps rethink it!

Sunscreen should be liberally applied, especially if your child will be outside for a long time. If you are worried about their skin sensitivity or want to know how best to protect them from the sun use sunscreen with SPF 50+ and always test it on a small area of skin first before applying all over.

Young babies need to be kept cool and away from direct sun. Babies should only be outside for a short amount of time in the morning or evening when the sun isn’t as strong. You can still get the benefits of sunlight by spending time outside in the shade.