Why do Babies Hate Getting their Temperature Taken? (What to Do)

  • By: Sandra
  • Date: March 18, 2022
  • Time to read: 6 min.

If you’ve ever had to take a baby’s temperature, you know that it can be a pretty traumatic experience. Babies hate getting their temperature taken, and they often scream and cry when it happens. But why is that? What is going on in the brain when a baby experiences this kind of stress?

It’s never fun when your baby is sick, and one of the worst parts is having to take their temperature 

Babies hate getting their temperature taken. It takes too long to get an accurate reading, they don’t like being annoyed by the thermometer, and worst of all – it’s just not fun for either of you.

Why do Babies Hate Temperature Taking?

Babies hate getting their temperature taken for a variety of reasons – it can be uncomfortable, scary, or simply annoying. However, it’s important to get an accurate reading of your baby’s temperature so that you can properly care for them.

Also you may be taking their temperature when they are feeling ill or when they have a diaper rash so it might be uncomfortable. Just like why babies hate getting dressed, look for reasons which might be causing the discomfort.

What is the Temperature for a Baby?

The temperature for a baby is typically around 98.60 degrees Fahrenheit, give or take a degree or two. When you’re taking your baby’s temperature, it’s important to get an accurate reading so that you can make sure they are not running a fever.

Most kids don’t like having their temperature taken as we normally need to do it when they are not feeling well. Other temperature-taking methods, like as pacifier thermometers and temperature-sensitive strips placed on a child’s forehead, are too unreliable, according to doctors.

Whichever method you choose, don’t take your child’s temperature shortly after a bath, when his body temperature is likely to be momentarily increased. For an accurate reading, wait at least 20 minutes after bath time and if you can’t get a reading but know your child is well then call your child’s doctor for advice.

How to Take a Baby’s Temperature

There are a few different ways to take a baby’s temperature, but the most common is by using a thermometer in their mouth. This can be tricky because babies often don’t like having things put in their mouths, and they especially don’t like having something cold touch their skin.

When you’re taking your baby’s temperature, you’re looking for a number called the “core temperature.” This is the temperature of the baby’s internal organs, and it’s what you’re really trying to measure. The core temperature can be affected by things like exercise, stress, and fever, so it’s important to get an accurate reading.

Temporal artery thermometers, which employ an infrared scanner to monitor a baby’s temperature with a simple swipe over the forehead, and tympanic (ear) thermometers, which can be more difficult to use, are more expensive choices.

What kind of thermometer should I use?

There are a few different types of thermometers that you can use to take your baby’s temperature. The most common is the oral thermometer, which goes in the baby’s mouth. You can also use a digital ear thermometer or an infrared forehead thermometer.

Skin temperature measuring strips that are pushed against the skin are not advised for newborns. Touching a baby’s skin can tell you if he or she is warm or chilly, but it cannot be used to gauge body temperature. To check your child’s temperature, always use a digital thermometer.

Which one you choose depends on what is easiest for you and your baby. The oral thermometer is the most accurate, but some babies don’t like having things put in their mouths. The digital ear thermometer is easy to use and doesn’t bother the baby as much, but it’s not as accurate as the oral thermometer. The infrared forehead thermometer is fast and easy to use, but it can be less accurate than the other two types.

Are forehead thermometers accurate for babies?

The forehead thermometer is fast and easy to use, but it can be less accurate than the other two types. To use it, you place the probe against your baby’s forehead and wait for a few seconds until the thermometer beeps. The temperature will then show up on the screen.

Some doctors advise taking a baby’s temperature in his or her armpit, called the armpit temperature. This is referred to as the axillary temperature. It’s simple, quick, and secure, and all you need is a regular digital thermometer. The disadvantage is that armpit reading of the body temperature are far less reliable than other approaches. An external armpit reading can be up to 2 degrees lower than an internal rectal thermometer reading.

Why don’t you take a baby’s temperature orally?

The oral thermometer is the most accurate type of thermometer, but it can be tricky to use because babies often don’t like having things put in their mouths. It also can cause injury which is why not everyone recommends it for babies.

To use it, you place the thermometer under your baby’s tongue and wait for a few seconds until it beeps giving you her oral temperature. The temperature will then show up on the oral thermometers screen.

Never use a mercury thermometer with a child. Mercury is a toxic substance, and it’s dangerous to have around children. If you have an old mercury thermometer, take it to a hazardous waste center so that it can be disposed of properly.

How to use a digital ear thermometer?

The digital ear thermometer is easy to use and doesn’t bother the baby as much, but it’s not as accurate as the oral thermometer. To use it, you place the probe of the digital thermometers in your baby’s ear and wait for a few seconds until it beeps. The temperature will then show up on the screen.

No matter which type of thermometer you choose, make sure to read the instructions carefully so that you get an accurate reading.

What is the most accurate way to take a baby’s temperature?

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises taking a baby’s temperature rectally, by inserting a thermometer into the baby’s anus, for the best results in babies and toddlers up to 3 years old.

How to Use a Rectal Thermometer

The rectal temperature of a baby is the most accurate measurement of their core temperature, but it’s also the most invasive. Rectal thermometers may accidentally perforate (puncture) the rectum. It may also transmit germs from one person to another.

If you are experienced in using rectal thermometers then we advise doing this on a changing table on his or her belly facing down. Soap and water or rubbing alcohol can be used to clean the thermometer. Rinse well with cold water. Then, for easy insertion, cover the end with petroleum jelly.

Place your hand near the baby’s head on his or her lower back and use your thumb and fingers to separate the baby’s buttocks. Gently insert the greased bulb end of the thermometer one-half to one inch, or just past the anal sphincter muscle, using your other hand. The thermometer should be directed at the child’s belly button.

This accurate method is best done at diaper changes.

Call your baby’s healthcare practitioner if his or her rectal reading or temporal artery temperature is 100.4°F (38°C) or higher.

What should I do if my baby’s temperature is high?

If your baby’s temperature is high, you need to take them to the doctor right away. A fever can be a sign of a serious illness, and it’s important to get it checked out as soon as possible.

When you’re taking your baby’s temperature, it’s important to be patient and careful. You want to make sure that you get an accurate reading so that you can properly care for your little one. If you have any questions about how to take a baby’s temperature, be sure to ask your pediatrician.

Take Away

As parents of a new baby it can be very stressful if you think your child is sick, but won’t let you take them temperature. However, as long as you are not hurting your baby it is important that you try and accurately measure their temperature.

There are a variety of methods for taking a baby’s temperature, but the most accurate is through a rectal thermometer. If you have any questions about taking your baby’s temperature, be sure to ask your pediatrician.